5 Games To Play With Your Bird

Face it: We?e here to entertain our birds, not the other way around.

Playtime is bonding time!  Via  Arwen7/Flickr
Playtime is bonding time! Via Arwen7/Flickr

Here are five simple games to play with your pet bird to keep her occupied and engaged. Have fun!

Fetch:

No, your bird isn’t fetching anything — you are. We all know this parrot game. You hand your bird something. She tosses it. You pick it up, brush it off and hand it to her again. She tosses it again. No need for frustration. Your bird isn’t rejecting your offer, she just likes to see you “fetch,” so indulge her.

Roll The Ball Or Catch:

A lot of birds love a good game of catch. Roll a ball to your bird and have her catch it. Whiffle balls or koosh balls work well for “catch.” Larger birds are more apt to do this, but you’ll be surprised at how apt a little bird can be at “catch.” Don’t expect your bird to roll the ball back though!

Shell Game:

Find three unwaxed paper cups and an almond or other goodie that your parrot likes, and play the “shell game.” Put the goodie under one cup and shuffle it around. Try to get your parrot to guess where the goodie is. Remember, you’re just doing this for fun, so even if she doesn’t guess right, give her the goodie.

Peek-A-Parrot:

With both of you on a bed or other safe area, place a towel or sheet over your head and peek out, calling your parrot to gain her attention. Then cover your head again, calling her to find you. You can also cover your parrot if she will allow it.

Foraging Box:

Fill a shallow cardboard box with all kinds of clean, fun refuse you would have tossed out over the month: plastic bottle caps, scraps of paper (crumpled into balls), other clean plastic refuse and so on. Add some nuts, foot toys, clean rocks, marbles, paper rope or anything else you have around. Play in the box together on a bed, couch, floor or other safe area.

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Article Categories:
Behavior and Training · Birds

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