Captive Bred Yellow Tangs Up Close!

Hopefully we will see captive bred yellow tangs at local fish stores in the near future.

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These yellow tang are around 61 days post hatch. Photo via Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University
These yellow tang are around 61 days post hatch. Photo via Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University
John Virata

The Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University has released video of its yellow tang (Zebrasoma flavescens) successes so far this year. There are just a handful of fish showing yellow but it is a great leap forward when compared to last year where a single specimen made it to 83 days post hatch.

Yellow Tang video by Blake

They are a little camera shy, but here's some video of our recently settled Yellow Tang!! If you look closely you'll see some that are still in the process of turning yellow.

Posted by Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University on Saturday, October 24, 2015

This year’s group is at Day 83 today and they are looking very healthy. The work at OI seems to be paying off. Let’s cross our collective fingers in the hopes that we continue to see successes with this species, and thank the scientists who worked on the project: Dean Kline, Emma Forbes, Aurora Burgess, Erin Pereira, Randall Scarborough, Renee Tousse, and Blake Thompson)

These yellow tang are around 83 days post hatch. Screengrab via Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University

The big difference over last year? The team at OI is overlapping live feeds for longer durations, with larger combinations of copepods, rotifers and artemia, coupled with the introduction of dry feeds at earlier stages of their development.

So what does the promise of captive bred yellow tangs mean for the hobby? Will successful breeding programs reduce the need for wild caught yellow tangs? It is up to the hobby to support captive breeding efforts to reduce pressures on wild caught specimens. Is it worth it to pay a few dollars more for a captive bred specimen that is free of parasites and disease and is feeding on commercially prepared foods? Absolutely it is. Hopefully we will see captive bred yellow tangs at local fish stores in the future.

Article Categories:
Fish · Lifestyle

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