Detroit Suburb Lifts Pit Bull Ban After Dog Saves Domestic Abuse Victim

A Pit Bull credited with saving her owner's life is allowed to stay in her home now that the town has lifted its Pit Bull ban.

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Isis and other Pit Bulls are no longer banned from Hazel Park, Michigan. Via WJBK
Isis and other Pit Bulls are no longer banned from Hazel Park, Michigan. Via WJBK

When Jamie Kraczkowski and her beloved Isis gained national fame after the 2-year-old Pit Bull jumped in to save her owner during a domestic abuse altercation, Kraczkowski was told she must get rid of her dog or leave Hazel Park, Michigan, because of a law banning this breed of dog within city limits.

Thanks to the passionate cry from Pit Bull owners and those who supported the dog’s actions, the Hazel Park City Council lifted the breed ban Wednesday that had been in place since 2013, reports WJBK, the Fox affiliate for the Detroit area.

The outcry against the ban began in late February after Kraczkowski’s then-boyfriend became drunk, angry and eventually violent, hitting her head against the wall. Isis — who also goes by “Ice” — grabbed and bit the attacker’s leg, causing the man to get 30 stitches, as Petcha.com earlier reported.

Jamie Kraczkowski  of Hazel Park, Michigan, is able to keep her dog, Isis, after the City Council lifted a ban on the breed Wednesday. Via WJBK

Jamie Kraczkowski of Hazel Park, Michigan, is able to keep her dog, Isis, after the City Council lifted a ban on the breed Wednesday. Via WJBK

At the time, euthanization would have been Ice’s fate. However due to the circumstances, authorities told Kraczkowski she had five days to get rid of her dog.

“When I heard there was the ban on pit bulls I was pretty upset,” Suzanne Rondeau, who helped fight for the ordinance change, told WJBK. “I have pit bulls, so basically I couldn’t live in Hazel Park.”

That all changed this week, when Pit Bull supporters got the thumbs up from the city they’d been looking for. However, it does come with some stipulations: The dogs have to have a license, their shots and must go through a behavioral assessment to make sure that they’re not dangerous. There also is a fence and insurance requirement regardless if the resident is a renter or a landlord.

Pit Bulls aren’t the problems. The people who own them and raise them are the problem,” resident Al Bouchard told the news station. “They’re the ones who need to be put to sleep.”

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