Help Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary Name Their Baby Glossy Black Cockatoo

The baby parrot represents a big step toward conservation efforts for the vulnerable Australian species.

The baby parrot represents a big step toward conservation efforts for the vulnerable Australian species.

Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary in Queensland, Australia is asking the public for help in for naming their 3-week-old baby glossy black cockatoo. The hatchling is being described as a “rare native treasure,?according to the Brisbane Times, and breeding the species for a “significant achievement?given the vulnerable state of glossy black cockatoos in the wild.

A little birdie told me that we needed help with finding the perfect name for our Glossy Black Cockatoo!Squark Us Your Name!http://www.cws.org.au/squawk-us-a-name-suggestion/

Posted by National Trust Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary on Tuesday, July 21, 2015

According to the Sanctuary? page on the species:

Glossy Black-cockatoos are the smallest of Australia? black cockatoo species and one of the most threatened. Glossy? are fussy eaters and forage almost exclusively on the cones of the She-oak (Casuarina and Allocasuarina spp.). They will even bypass trees in full seed to visit a preferred species up to [6 miles] away. Little is known about the movement of Glossy Black-cockatoos within their range but the clearing and fragmentation of their habitat has taken its toll on this habitual species. Without bushland corridors and stands of remnant forests, research indicates the species is in decline.

Because of their restrictive diets, and also how long it takes them to become sexually mature, it can be difficult to breed glossy black cockatoos in captivity. That? why the little fledging represents so much for the future of its species ?not only as another member but as a hope that conservationists can help breed more species to help those in the wild. According to Glossy Black Conservancy spokesperson Jedd Appleton, speaking to the Brisbane Times, the “new birth was a great step towards further conservation efforts.?lt;/span>

“They don’t always do so well in the wild, so it’s good to know captive breeding can be successful,?he said.

Previous: This Story About A Homeless Jazz Singer, Her Amazon Parrot & Gabriel Foundation Will Warm Your Heart 

All Bird News 

Article Categories:
Trending

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *