Little Dinosaur-Like Lizard Shoots Blood From Its Eyes To Ward Off Predators

The short-horned lizard's blood shooting defense is unique among reptiles.

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The short-tailed lizard can aim a steady stream of blood at would-be predators. Via National Geographic
The short-tailed lizard can aim a steady stream of blood at would-be predators. Via National Geographic
John Virata

Short-horned lizards are among the most unique reptiles in the world. If any lizard looks like it came straight out of the Jurassic era, the horned lizards, or horny toads, have to be on the top of the list.

They have horns on their head like a triceratops, and unlike any other reptile in the world, they have a unique defense mechanism that wards off most would-be predators. As this National Geographic video shows, short-horned lizards (and most other horned lizard species) can aim and shoot a steady stream of blood from the corner of their eye about three to five feet.
 

The blood-shooting defense mechanism is just one tactic these ant-eating reptiles use to ward off predators. They also have the ability to puff their bodies up, making themselves larger to discourage predators, and they have those horns on their heads to keep certain predators at bay.
 

The short-tailed lizard employs a unique defense to ward off predators. Via National Geographic

The short-tailed lizard employs a unique defense to ward off predators. Via National Geographic

But it is the blood letting that is the most unique aspect of their defense capabilities. The blood of the short-horned lizard is supposed to confuse a predator that would want to eat it, but it also has a chemical makeup that is noxious to predators, according to National Geographic. It is a weird defense, but it has been proven to work!

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