Rabbit Breed List

Pique your interest with a bit of info about the 49 rabbit breeds currently recognized in the United States by the American Rabbit Breeders Association.

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The American Rabbit Breeders Association recognizes 49 breeds of rabbits. Kaz/Pixabay
The American Rabbit Breeders Association recognizes 49 breeds of rabbits. Kaz/Pixabay

Rabbits. They’ve been a part of people’s lives for thousands of years. During that time, rabbit breeds from the species Oryctolagus cuniculus have graduated to being more than just livestock. Many also have become pets and stars of the show ring. This shift is reflected in the fact that the large, livestock-oriented breeds that were popular in the early 1900s have been replaced in popularity by smaller breeds. And rabbit breeders continue to develop new and exciting breeds to give people wonder.

From smallest to largest (when maximum weights are the same, breeds then list alphabetically), here is a list of the rabbit breeds recognized by the American Rabbit Breeders Association. Rabbit organizations in other countries may recognize more breeds or fewer breeds, and some breeds might be known by different names. Whatever the name, all rabbits seem to be able to turn up the cute factor and win fans.

More information and photos will be added to the breed descriptions as time permits, so check back. Sources for the below data include ARBA, the breed club websites and the book “Domestic Rabbits And Their Histories” by Bob Whitman.

Britannia Petite

This tiny rabbit has a maximum weight of 2.5 pounds and originated in England. Its body type is a full arch and the fur is flyback. It was recognized by the American Rabbit Breeders Association in 1977. Recognized colors are black, black otter, blue-eyed white, broken, chestnut agouti, ruby-eyed white and sable marten. The breed is called the Polish in the United Kingdom. It could not be called Polish in the United States because a different breed called Polish was already recognized by ARBA when the Britannia Petite sought recognition. The club slogan/motto is “The Elite of the Fancy.”

For more information, check out the American Britannia Petite Rabbit Society.

Netherland Dwarf

A popular breed, this tiny rabbit has a maximum weight of 2.5 pounds, it originated in the Netherlands and was recognized by ARBA in 1969. It has a compact body type, rollback fur and comes in more than 20 colors in five groups, including black, blue, chocolate, lilac, blue-eyed white, ruby-eyed white, sable point, Siamese sable, otter, squirrel, chestnut, chinchilla, tan, fawn and orange. The club slogan/motto is “Gem of the Fancy.”

For more information, visit the American Netherland Dwarf Rabbit Club.

Dwarf Hotot

This little rabbit has a maximum weight of 3 pounds. Developed in Germany, the breed has a compact body type, rollback fur and only one recognized color: White with dark eyebands. The club slogan/motto is “The Eyes of the Fancy.”

See the American Dwarf Hotot Rabbit Club for more info.

Jersey Wooly

Another popular breed, the Jersey Wooly was developed in the United States and recognized by ARBA in 1988. Its maximum weight is 3.5 pounds and it is one of the few breeds with wool-textured fur. Its body type is compact and it comes in more than 20 colors in six groups, including pointed white, broken, chestnut, chinchilla, black, blue, blue-eyed white, ruby-eyed white, chocolate, lilac, smoke pearl, black otter and more. The club slogan/motto is “The Fluff of the Fancy.”

Click over to the National Jersey Wooly Rabbit Club to get more info.

Polish

Hailing from Europe, the exact origin of the Polish could be England or Germany. It was recognized by ARBA in 1938 and has a maximum weight of 3.5 pounds. Its fur is flyback and its body type is compact. Six varieties are recognized: black, blue, chocolate, ruby-eyed white, blue-eyed white and broken. The club slogan/motto is “The Little Aristocrat.”

For more information, see the American Polish Rabbit Club.

Lionhead 

One of the most recent breeds recognized by ARBA, the Lionhead got approval at the 2013 ARBA annual convention. Its fur is a mix of wool, and it is recognized in all four tortoise colors and ruby-eyed white. The breed originated in Europe, perhaps Belgium. Its maximum weight is 3.75 pounds.

Learn more at the North American Lionhead Rabbit Club website.

American Fuzzy Lop

Developed in the United States, the American Fuzzy Lop is another of the few wool breeds. It was recognized by ARBA in 1988, has a compact body type and weighs a maximum of 4 pounds. Recognized colors include chestnut, chinchilla, lynx, opal, squirrel, white, black, blue, blue-eyed white, chocolate, lilac, ruby-eyed white, sable point, Siamese sable, Siamese smoke pearl, tortoise shell, blue tortoise shell, fawn, orange. The club slogan/motto is “Head of the Fancy.”

Discover more at the American Fuzzy Lop Rabbit Club website.

Holland Lop 

This popular breed offers one of the largest varieties of colors. It weighs in at 4 pounds maximum and was developed in the Netherlands. It got ARBA recognition in 1979 and has a compact body type with rollback fur. It offers more than 25 colors in 8 groups, including chinchilla, lynx, opal, squirrel, broken, black, blue, chocolate, lilac, blue-eyed white, rube-eyed white, sable point, tortoise, otter, fawn, orange. The club slogan/motto is “The Hallmark Breed.”

Get more info at the Holland Lop Rabbit Specialty Club.

Himalayan 

The origins of the Himalayan are unknown, perhaps it developed in Asia. It is the only breed with a cylindrical body type and has flyback fur. Its maximum weight is 4.5 pounds. Recognized colors are black, blue, chocolate and lilac. The black Himalayan occurred in nature, meaning it was not created by man cross-breeding other rabbit breeds. It is an ancient breed that is known by many names around the world.

Check out the American Himalayan Rabbit Association.

Mini Rex 

The Mini Rex is one of the most popular breeds in the United States based on entries at ARBA shows. It weighs in at 4.5 pounds maximum, has a compact body type and the famous rex fur that stands up. Only the Rex also has this fur. It as recognized in 1988 by ARBA and can weight up to 4.5 pounds. It’s available in more than a dozen colors, including broken, castor, black, blue, blue-eyed white, chinchilla, chocolate, Himalayan, red, tortoise and white. The club slogan/motto is “The People’s Choice in a Fancy Breed.”

See more at the National Mini Rex Club.

Mini Satin 

Another recent addition to ARBA, the Mini Satin was the 47th recognized breed in 2005. It has a compact body type and the rare satin fur, which is translucent. It was developed in the United States and it can weigh up to 4.75 pounds. There are 14 accepted colors: black, blue, broken, chinchilla, chocolate, chocolate agouti, copper, opal, otter, red, Siamese, silver marten, tortoise and white. The club slogan/motto for both Satins and Mini Satins is “A Team With Sheen.”

Learn more at the American Satin Rabbit Breeders Association.

Dutch 

One of the most easily identifiable and popular breeds, the Dutch was developed in England from a rabbit breed from Belgium. It has a compact body type, flyback fur and weighs 5.5 pounds maximum. Recognized colors are black, blue, chinchilla, chocolate, gray, steel and tortoise. All colors should have a white “saddle” and a wedge-shaped blaze on the nose.

Get your computer mouse to the American Dutch Rabbit Club.

Florida White 

Originating in the United States, the Florida White has a compact body type and flyback fur. It was recognized by ARBA in 1967 and weighs a maximum of 6 pounds. There is only one recognized color: White with pink eyes.

Visit the Florida White Rabbit Breeders Association.

Tan 

This small rabbit has a body type with a full arch, flyback fur and weighs a maximum of 6 pounds. It was developed in England and recognized by a previous incarnation of ARBA in 1910. It is recognized in four colors: black, blue, lilac and chocolate. The club slogan/motto is “Aristocrat of the Fancy.”

More info awaits at the American Tan Rabbit Specialty Club.

Thrianta 

One of the newer breeds, it was recognized by ARBA in 2005. Its claim to fame is the distinctive, bright orange-red color of its fur, which inspired the club’s slogan/motto “Fire of the Fancy.” It has a compact body type, rollback fur and weighs up to 6 pounds. It was developed in the Netherlands. It is recognized in only one color: bright orange-red.

See what other info is at the American Thrianta Rabbit Breeders Association.

Havana 

This compact breed was developed in the Netherlands and recognized by ARBA in 1916. It has flyback fur and weighs up to 6.5 pounds. Havanas are known for lustrous, richly colored fur. Recognized colors include black, blue, broken (chocolate) and chocolate. The club slogan/motto is “The Mink of the Rabbit Family.”

Look for more info at the Havana Rabbit Breeders Association.

Mini Lop 

A breed from Germany, the Mini Lop earned ARBA recognition in 1980 and has enjoyed great popularity. It has a compact body, rollback fur and can weigh up to 6.5 pounds. There are more than 20 colors in seven groups, including black, blue, chocolate, lilac, white, broken, tortoise, sable, chinchilla, silver, steel, fawn, orange and red. The club slogan/motto is “Lops of Excellence.”

See more about it at the American Mini Lop Rabbit Club.

Silver

This is an ancient and rare breed whose origins are unclear. It was recognized by a previous incarnation of ARBA in 1910. It weighs in at up to 7 pounds and has a compact build and flyback fur. It is recognized in three varieties: black, brown and fawn. The club slogan/motto is “The Sterling Breed.” It is listed as threatened according to the Livestock Conservancy. This means that it has fewer than 100 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 1,000.

Check out the National Silver Rabbit Club.

English Angora 

Yes, this breed was developed in England. It is one of the four Angora breeds, which all share the wool fur type. Its build is compact and it weighs 7.5 pounds at most. It was recognized by ARBA in 1932. This is the only Angora that has bangs and side trimmings that cover its face. It comes in more than 30 recognized colors, including pointed white, blue-eyed white, ruby-eyed white, chinchilla, broken, squirrel, chestnut, opal, black, blue, chocolate, lilac, pearl, sable, seal, smoke pearl, tortoiseshell, steel, cream, fawn, red.

Go to the National Angora Rabbit Breeders Club.

Standard Chinchilla 

Developed in France, this breed comes in only the chinchilla color. It has a compact body, rollback fur and weighs in at up to 7.5 pounds. It was recognized by ARBA in 1924. The club slogan/motto is “The Grandaddy of all Chins, The Original Chin.”

Information awaits at the American Standard Chinchilla Association.

English Spot 

One of the few breeds with the full arch body type, the English Spot was recognized by ARBA in 1924 and weighs up to 8 pounds. It has flyback fur and is known for its distinctive markings. Recognized colors include black, blue, chocolate, gold, gray, lilac, tortoise. The club slogan/motto is “Spotted Beauty of the Rabbit World.”

Visit with a click the American English Spot Rabbit Club website.

Lilac 

Both England and the Netherlands developed the Lilac rabbit. It weighs a maximum of 8 pounds and has a compact build with rollback fur. There is only one recognized color: Lilac. The Livestock Conservancy lists the Lilac as being on “watch” status. This means that it has fewer than 200 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 2,000.

Click to see the National Lilac Rabbit Club of America website.

Belgian Hare 

The breed originated in Belgium but was perfected in England. It is credited with starting the domestic rabbit movement in the United States. It has a full arch body type and flyback fur. It dates back to the 1880s in the United States and has a maximum weight of 9.5 pounds. There is only one recognized color: A deep red coat with black, wavy ticking. It is listed as threatened according to the Livestock Conservancy. This means that it has fewer than 100 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 1,000.

See more at the American Belgian Hare Club.

Harlequin 

Developed in France, this breed has a commercial body type and flyback fur. It can weigh up to 9.5 pounds and was recognized by ARBA in 1928. There are two groups in this breed, Japanese and Magpie. Each has four color varieties: black, blue, chocolate and lilac. This breed was originally called the Japanese, but it was changed to Harlequin in the 1940s.

Visit the American Harlequin Rabbit Club.

Satin Angora 

One of the four Angoras, the Satin is said to have the finest wool of the four and the only one that has the sheen of satin. It weighs in at 9.5 pounds tops and was recognized by ARBA in 1987. It has a commercial body type and comes in more than 30 recognized colors, including pointed white, blue-eyed white, ruby-eyed white, chinchilla, broken, squirrel, chestnut, opal, black, blue, chocolate, lilac, pearl, sable, seal, smoke pearl, tortoiseshell, steel, cream, fawn, red. The Satin Angora originated in Canada.

Get more info at the National Angora Rabbit Breeders Club.

Silver Marten 

It’s probable that this breed developed naturally in Europe, England and the United States around the same time. It has a commercial build, weighs up to 9.5 pounds and flyback fur. It is recognized in four colors: black, chocolate, blue and sable.

Check out the Silver Marten Rabbit Club.

American Sable 

Recognized in 1982, the American Sable weighs up to 10 pounds and has a commercial build. Its rollback fur is only recognized in one color: Shades of a rich sepia brown. 

See more at the American Sable Rabbit Society.

Rhinelander 

Yes, this breed hails from Germany. ARBA recognized it in 1975. It has a maximum weight of 10 pounds, a full arch build and flyback fur. There is only one recognized color: black and gold/orange markings on a white coat. A butterfly marking should be on the nose. The club slogan/motto is “The Calico of the Fancy.” The Livestock Conservancy lists the Rhinelander as being on “watch” status. This means that it has fewer than 200 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 2,000.

See more at the Rhinelander Rabbit Club of America.

Argente Brun 

The very latest breed to be recognized by ARBA at its 2015 convention, it will be official in 2016. It came from France and has a maximum weight of 10.5 pounds. Its body type is commercial and it has flyback fur. It is recognized in only one color: Chocolate with silver ticking.

While there is no official club yet, there is a Facebook page about the breed.

Californian

A breed developed in the United States, it gained ARBA recognition in 1949. It has a commercial build and flyback fur. It can weigh up to 10.5 pounds. There is only one recognized color: White with dark markings on the nose, ears, feet and tail. The club slogan/motto is “From the East to the West Californians are the Best.”

Visit the Californian Rabbit Specialty Club.

French Angora 

One of the four Angora wool breeds, this one weighs up to 10.5 pounds and was developed in France. It gained ARBA recognition in 1932. It has a commercial body type and comes in more than 30 recognized colors, including pointed white, blue-eyed white, ruby-eyed white, chinchilla, broken, squirrel, chestnut, opal, black, blue, chocolate, lilac, pearl, sable, seal, smoke pearl, tortoiseshell, steel, cream, fawn, red.

Go visit the National Angora Rabbit Breeders Club.

Rex 

The Rex is known for its plush fur that stands up. Only the Mini Rex also has this fur type. The Rex came from France, has a commercial build and can weigh up to 10.5 pounds. It was originally called the Castorrex. There are 16 varieties/groups recognized, including amber, blue, black, castor, broken, lilac, red and white. The club slogan/motto is “King of the Rabbits.”

See other information at the National Rex Rabbit Club.

Blanc de Hotot 

Weighing in at up to 11 pounds, this French breed got ARBA recognition in 1979. It has a commercial body type and rollback fur. There is only one recognized color: White with dark eyebands. The club slogan/motto is “The Rabbit For International Unity.” It is listed as threatened according to the Livestock Conservancy. This means that it has fewer than 100 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 1,000.

Check out other info at the Hotot Rabbit Breeders International website.

Cinnamon 

This U.S. breed can weigh up to 11 pounds, has a commercial body type, flyback fur and was recognized by ARBA in 1972. The breed club notes that is was created by accident by children, a brother and sister, beginning in 1962. There is only one recognized color: rust/cinnamon with gray ticking.

Learn more at the Cinnamon Rabbit Breeders Association.

Crème D’Argent

Developed in France, this breed was recognized by ARBA in 1938. It can weigh up to 11 pounds, has a commercial build and flyback fur. There is only one recognized color: Creamy white with an orange cast. The nose should have a butterfly marking. It is listed as recovering according to the Livestock Conservancy. This means it was in a category with very low population numbers, and although it has gained some it still needs monitoring.

Discover other information at the Crème D’Argent Federation.

Palomino 

Another breed developed in the United States, the Palomino has a commercial body type and flyback fur. It weighs up to 11 pounds and was recognized by ARBA in 1957. There are two recognized colors: Golden and lynx. The breed was originally called Washingtonian in honor of the state where it was developed. The club slogan/motto is “Be A Pal To The Pals.”

Find more info at the Palomino Rabbit Co-Breeders Association.

Satin

Weighing up the 11 pounds, this U.S. breed has a commercial build and satin fur, which is translucent. It was accepted by ARBA in 1956. There are 11 accepted colors/groups: black, blue, broken, Californian, chinchilla, chocolate, copper, otter, red, Siamese and white. The club slogan/motto for both Satins and Mini Satins is “A Team With Sheen.”

Visit the American Satin Rabbit Breeders Association.

American 

Recognized by a past incarnation of ARBA in 1917/1925, this breed with a semi-arch build has flyback fur. It can weigh up to 12 pounds. Recognized colors are blue and white. The club slogan/motto is “An American Classic.” It is listed as threatened according to the Livestock Conservancy. This means that it has fewer than 100 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 1,000.

Learn more at the Breeders of the American Rabbit.

American Chinchilla 

This up-to-12-pound rabbit from the United States has a commercial body type and rollback fur. A previous incarnation of ARBA recognized the breed in 1925. There is only one recognized color: Chinchilla. It is listed as critical (most endangered) according to the Livestock Conservancy. This means that it has fewer than 50 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 500.

Discover more at the American Chinchilla Rabbit Breeders Association.

Beveren 

Originating in Belgium, the Beveren has a semi-arch build and rollback fur. It can weigh up to 12 pounds. It was recognized by a previous incarnation of ARBA in 1925. Recognized colors include black, blue and white. The club slogan/motto is “The Breed of Distinction.” The Livestock Conservancy lists the Beveren as being on “watch” status. This means that it has fewer than 200 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 2,000.

Find more information at the American Beveren Rabbit Club.

Champagne D’Argent 

The breed can weigh up to 12 pounds and was developed in France. It has a commercial build and flyback fur. It was recognized by a previous incarnation of ARBA in 1928. There is only one recognized color: Silver. The nose and muzzle should be slightly darker to form a “butterfly” look that is characteristic of the breed.

Click on over to the Champagne D’Argent Rabbit Federation.

New Zealand 

The breed was developed in the United States and recognized by a predecessor to ARBA in 1916. It can weigh up to 12 pounds, has a commercial body type and flyback fur. Recognized colors are black, broken, white and red.

Visit the American Federation of New Zealand Rabbit Breeders.

Silver Fox 

The Silver Fox can weigh up to 12 pounds. It was developed in the United States and recognized by a predecessor to ARBA in 1929. It has a commercial body type and unique, stand-up fur. It is recognized in only one color: black. The club slogan/motto is “One of a Kind Since 1929.” It is listed as threatened according to the Livestock Conservancy. This means that it has fewer than 100 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 1,000.

Check out the National Silver Fox Rabbit Club.

Giant Chinchilla 

There is only one recognized color: Chinchilla. It has a semi-arch body type, flyback fur and can weigh up to 16 pounds. It was developed in the United States and recognized by a predecessor to ARBA in 1928. The club slogan/motto is “Million Dollar Rabbit.” The Livestock Conservancy lists the Giant Chinchilla as being on “watch” status. This means that it has fewer than 200 annual registrations with ARBA in the United States and its estimated global population is less than 2,000.

See more at Giant Chinchilla Rabbit Association.

Checkered Giant 

Giant is part of the name for a reason, this breed has no weight limit. It has a full arch body type, flyback fur and should have the butterfly marking on its nose. It hails from Germany. Recognized colors are blue and black. The club slogan/motto is “The Rabbit Beautiful.”

Check out the info at the American Checkered Giant Rabbit Club.

English Lop 

The English Lop is a semi-arched breed with flyback fur. Its distinctive long, lop ears make it easily identifiable. The fur is flyback, and it has no maximum weight. There are more than 20 colors in seven groups, including black, blue, chocolate, lilac, white, broken, tortoise, sable, chinchilla, silver, steel, fawn, orange and red. It is considered to be the oldest of the rabbit breeds for showing. The club slogan/motto is “King of the Fancy.”

Get more English Lop info at the Lop Rabbit Club of America.

Flemish Giant 

Another giant, this breed has no maximum weight limit. It is semi-arched with rollback fur. It originated in Belgium and was recognized by a predecessor to ARBA in 1915. Recognized colors are black, blue, fawn, light gray, sandy, steel gray, white.

Visit the National Federation of Flemish Giant Rabbit Breeders.

French Lop

Originating from France, the French Lop was recognized by a predecessor to ARBA in 1910. The breed has no weight limit. It has rollback fur and a commercial body type. There are more than 20 colors in seven groups, including black, blue, chocolate, lilac, white, broken, tortoise, sable, chinchilla, silver, steel, fawn, orange and red.

Get more French Lop info at the Lop Rabbit Club of America website.

Giant Angora 

One of the four Angora wool breeds, the Giant Angora is the largest with no weight limit. It has a commercial build and was developed in the United States. It got ARBA recognition in 1988. There is only one recognized color: Ruby-eyed white.

For more Giant Angora info, check the National Angora Rabbit Breeders Club.

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