Settlement Reached In Show Dog Neutering Case

The owners of a champion Bichon alleged the breeder had the dog neutered out of vengeance and held his sperm hostage.

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Show dog Beau Lemon was expected to breed with females until he turned 10 in hopes of passing on his legacy. Via Star Tribune
Show dog Beau Lemon was expected to breed with females until he turned 10 in hopes of passing on his legacy. Via Star Tribune

It is a Bichon battle of epic proportions… but a settlement may finally put an end to it.

Beau Lemon — a 6-year-old dog that won several accolades, including best in show titles twice and being ranked the second best of his breed in the nation — was expected to breed with females until he turned 10 in hopes of passing on his legacy. However, owners Mary and John Wangsness alleged that was cut short when, in 2013, Beau’s breeder had the Bichon Frisé neutered without their knowledge, reports the Star Tribune.

The Wangsnesses’ alleged in their suit that Beau’s breeder, Vickie Halstead, “acted in vengeance” by neutering the pup. The Minnesota couple reportedly tried to breed him twice without obtaining Halstead’s approval, which was required in a sales contract.

Today, ABC News reported that a confidential settlement was reached late Tuesday. The suit, filed in 2014, sought more than $50,000 in damages, as well as the eight vials of what the Wangsnesses allege to be Beau’s frozen semen, estimated to be worth $3,000 each.

Halstead’s attorney, Joseph Crosby, alleged that the Wangsnesses neglected Beau, causing him to suffer dental disease, a low sperm count, impacted anal glands and a matted and unhealthy coat.

Crosby didn’t specify how neutering Beau would address those issues, but said in his filing that it was “necessary” and that Beau would not have been bred because of his “deteriorated health condition.” And regarding the frozen semen, Crosby said it belongs to Beau’s brother, Beau Jangles, and that the confusion is due to the similar names.

The Star Tribune reports Mary Wangsness had always wanted a puppy from Beau and after hearing about the neutering, sunk into a depression, staying in bed for three weeks.

“She never bounced back,” John Wangsness said about his wife who died this past March.

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