Yearly Cost Of Owning A Ferret

Keeping any pet costs money, so what are the estimated annual costs for a ferret’s food, litter, toys, bedding and medical care?

After some initial one-time costs, ferret owners will still spend money on food, toys, bedding and other items for their ferrets every year. Brett_Hondow/Pixabay
After some initial one-time costs, ferret owners will still spend money on food, toys, bedding and other items for their ferrets every year. Brett_Hondow/Pixabay

By L. Vanessa Gruden

Q.

My little brother and I are interested in owning ferrets; two at that. We are planning on covering the costs on our own, but I’m curious on how much the yearly cost is for just one ferret alone. What is your estimate?

A.

Great question! It’s smart to think about ongoing expenditures before you get any pet.

Whether you get one or two ferrets, you will need a cage or pen, bedding, bowls and toys. Cages cost anywhere from $100 to $250. Secure carriers can be found for about $20. Good stainless-steel bowls are $15 to $20. Hammocks and sleep sacks are $10 to $20 each. Toys can be elaborate or as simple as a plastic grocery bag. In total, initial supplies will be $175 to $350.

Ferrets don’t eat huge amounts, but with ferret food, you get what you pay for. Budget roughly $10 to $15 monthly for quality kibble. Using litter adds an extra $5 to $10 monthly.

Let’s assume you plan to purchase ferrets that are already spayed/neutered. The purchase will be a one-time cost. Nearly all pet stores sell ferrets altered, and most shelters won’t adopt out unaltered animals. Should you purchase a ferret from a private breeder, you will need to add one-time costs of $150 to $300 for neutering or spay surgery (females are more expensive).

Ferrets need rabies and a canine distemper vaccination every year. Vet costs vary widely, but expect to pay $150 to $200 per ferret.

Save up $5 to $10 every month in case of an emergency or for health needs as your ferret ages. A little piggy bank of savings will ensure that you can afford medical treatment.

So, excluding all those one-time expenses, here’s an estimate of annual costs for one vs. two ferrets:

Wow, it adds up, doesn’t it? Now, in next month’s Q & A, I’d like to suggest ways to save while still giving your pet ferret great care.

Like this article? Please share it, and check out:
One Ferret Health Issue You Can’t Ignore Is Hair Loss
Essential Ferret Checklist
Need Supplies For A New Ferret?

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See all ferret health Q&As

Article Categories:
Critters · Ferrets

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