Yoga For Sugar Gliders And A Guinea Pig’s Eye Trouble

How did this sugar glider get its foot on its back, and what happened to a guinea pig’s eye?

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A sugar glider, such as this one, managed to get its leg stuck behind its back. vinaithong/iStock/Thinkstock
A sugar glider, such as this one, managed to get its leg stuck behind its back. vinaithong/iStock/Thinkstock
Dr. Jerry Murray

Last week a 10-year-old sugar glider came in with an odd presentation. He had his right leg twisted up and across his lower back. At 10 years old, he is considered a geriatric glider. He was kept with a small group of older gliders.

There were no signs of fighting between him and his cagemates. He had no visible wounds, and he was still active despite only being able to use three legs. He was underweight and may have been unable to get to his food bowl. The owner was afraid he had a fracture in the leg or a dislocated hip.

I was unable to find any fractures or painful areas on the leg. The owner authorized anesthesia to further examine his leg and hip. Under light sedation with sevoflurane, the leg was gently returned to its normal position. Further palpation of the hip joint and leg did not reveal any abnormalities. The sugar glider was able to use the leg normally when he woke up. I am not sure how the leg ended up in such an abnormal position, but the owner was glad he was not seriously injured.

guinea pig came in at the beginning of July with an injury to his left eye. The owner was not sure how or when the injury occurred. The guinea pig was kept by himself, but young children played with him daily. He was bathed on a weekly basis.

After removing the discharge from the eye, it was clear that he had a deep ulcer of the cornea. Ideally, a referral to a veterinary ophthalmologist would be the next step to see if the cornea needed surgical repair; however, the owner declined this. The guinea pig was started on a broad-spectrum antibiotic eyedrop. I was unable to determine the exact cause of the eye injury, but it might have been secondary to getting shampoo on his little eye.

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Article Categories:
Critters · Guinea Pigs · Sugar Gliders

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